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We Have Not Yet Begun to Fight...

 

Bolstered by aid from the New England Power Generators Association (NEPGA), misguided environmentalists, perennial activists and natural gas lobbyists flocked to Concord’s Grappone Conference Center in opposition to the Northern Pass project.

But times are changing and even the most fervent and well-funded efforts by major oil and natural gas interests couldn’t stifle the throngs of New Hampshire workers adorning blue and green, who made it clear the fight is far from over. 

Last night, “we have not yet begun to fight” was more than a tagline.  It was a timely reference to another event on September 23, albeit 234 years prior, that characterizes New England’s resolve in the face of overwhelming odds.

Northern Pass opponents expected little resistance and were sorely mistaken.  Visibly annoyed lobbyists from NEPGA and various environmental groups exchanged stunned glances as Northern Pass supporters poured into the room. 

And to those who attended similar hearings over two years ago, the contrast was stunning.  The blaze-orange hue that once dominated Northern Pass hearings is now subdued -- the once rabid battle cries replaced with a more conciliatory tone.  

Even the popped collar of windmill apologist Jack Savage appeared worn and tattered like the battle flag of an army in retreat.  While Savage and his financiers will live to fight another day, they do so knowing that they have met their John Paul Jones in New Hampshire’s working class...

(Below are excerpts from an article in the Concord Monitor about the event.  You can read the full article here)

Hundreds of friends, foes of Northern Pass turn out at public forum in Concord

By BEN LEUBSDORF

Monitor staff

 

After three years of debate, the arguments over the Northern Pass project can be as familiar as the blaze-orange worn by its opponents: it will create badly needed jobs, it will damage the environment, it will help diversify the power supply for New England’s electricity grid, it will scar New Hampshire with ugly transmission towers.

But people still came out in force last night – more than 500, filling a ballroom at the Grappone Conference Center in Concord – for a chance to tell federal officials what they think about the project.

“I have 50 apprentices who would give their eyeteeth to work this job,” said Jonathan Mitchell, who runs the apprentice training program at IBEW Local 490 in Concord...

Northern Pass, with a $1.4 billion price tag, is Northeast Utilities’s plan to bring 1,200 megawatts of hydropower from Quebec to the New England power grid through New Hampshire on 187 miles of transmission lines – including, in the latest version of the plan, nearly 8 miles of underground lines...

...[Supporters say] the project will create good-paying jobs, both during construction and at the planned converter terminal in Franklin, and help diversify the region’s power supply.

Before construction can begin, the project needs approval from the federal government, which must grant permission to cross the U.S.-Canadian border and to pass through the White Mountain National Forest, and from New Hampshire’s Site Evaluation Committee.

Last night’s forum in Concord was the first of four planned this week, a so-called “scoping meeting” as the U.S. Department of Energy prepares to draw up an Environmental Impact Statement for the project. The department held seven such meetings in 2011, but after the Northern Pass submitted a revised route this summer, more meetings were scheduled to gather additional public input...

...[Senator] Hosmer said, “The Northern Pass is looking for a second opportunity to make a first impression, and we know how difficult that is. They’ve been willing to lower the structure size, they’ve been willing to put some of these transmission lines underground. It’s not perfect, but they have shown a willingness to come to the table and to compromise.”

Hundreds of people turned out last night – many from the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers and wearing pro-Northern Pass T-shirts, with several bucket trucks parked outside...

For hours they spoke for and against the project, both in general and to address what should be included in the environmental impact statement...

Northern Pass officials have said it would be far too expensive to bury the entire length of the project, and that they’ve reduced the height of many transmission towers in the revised plan issued this summer. The common height, they say, is 85 to 95 feet...

Olé

 

In response to Jane Difley's op-ed on the Northern Pass Transmission project we decided to dust of an old gem from the archives.

The article below, titled "Forest Society's Priorities Are Blowin' in the Wind" is not an homage to Bob Dylan.  It is a scathing indictment of a once-pure but now ideologically-adrift Forest Society by former State Rep Fran Wendelboe.

Although we don't typically post anti-Northern Pass articles on this blog, we encourage you to read Jane Difley's op-ed here.  

But, while you're reading it keep in mind that the very same Jane Difley yelled "Olé" when Spanish energy giant Iberdrola Renewables built 500-ft. wind turbines on top of our mountains.

What's that you say?

Oh, right... they're called the "Forest Society" not the "Mountain Society".  We apologize.

Enjoy!

 

Forest Society's Priorities Are Blowin’ in the Wind

What has become of the Society for the Protection of NH Forests mission and priorities?  It appears that misguided fundraising has the organization lost in the woods.

The Forest Society has raised and spent millions buying land in hopes of killing the Northern Pass project, claiming transmission lines would damage New Hampshire’s landscape.  Forest Society spokesman Will Abbott recently stated, “The economies of central and northern NH are heavily dependent on the landscape, and if you scar the landscape, you scar the economy.”

Naturally, one would think the Forest Society would be equally opposed to 400-foot tall, night lit wind turbines “scarring” the tops of well-known and scenic mountains that can be seen up to 40 miles away.  Yet, instead of opposing the massive 24-tower wind farm, the Forest Society played a strange and significant role in paving the way for that project to be built.

In 2009, Spanish-owned Iberdola Renewables came to New Hampshire wanting to build “Groton Wind,” and needing to lease about 3,900 acres from Green Acres Woodlands, a private timberland owner.  Groton Wind knew the Forest Society was trying to put the land under a conservation easement, and told the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services in October 2009, “Groton Wind is planning to assist the Forest Society to help make this happen.”

At a 2009 meeting with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Groton Wind said it was assisting the Forest Society in getting the easement, “by providing in-kind services and environmental information and potentially funding of the project.”  It was suggested that its “proposed contribution to the [Forest Society] conservation easement over the leased lands could be considered as appropriate mitigation,” to get Groton Wind approved.

An April, 2010 Forest Society letter to DES attempted to clarify the strange relationship between the threesome: landowner Green Acres Woodlands, the Spanish wind farm developer that needed the land, and the Forest Society, which supposedly wanted to protect the land from development.  In her letter, Forest Society President Jane Difley admitted that the society was being “compensated” by Green Acres Woodlands, which was now listed as a wind farm partner, and that the Forest Society would “not be offering an opinion on the Wind Project as part of the permitting process.”  It’s no wonder.  In its permit application, Groton Wind states that as compensatory mitigation for its wetlands impacts, it will assist the Forest Society, “in its efforts to protect up to 6,578 acres of land in Groton, Hebron, Rumney, Dorchester, and Plymouth in a conservation easement...” 

The Forest Society was also happy to accept Groton Wind’s in-kind service for “survey and other data,” but this does not imply that they support the project.  As Shakespeare writes in Hamlet, “The lady doth protest too much, methinks.”

The Forest Society had numerous reasons to oppose Groton Wind, including a multi-year effort to put the land under a conservation easement through the federally funded Forest Legacy Program.  In November 2007, the Forest Society announced it was working on, “securing $3.6 million federal funding to buy a conservation easement on 6,578 acres of working forest in Groton, Hebron and Plymouth.  Owned by Green Acres Woodlands, a private timberland owner, the land forms the core of one of the largest and most ecologically rich forests south of the White Mountains…”

Another reason is that the Forest Society’s Cockermouth Forest abuts Groton Wind.  Cockermouth consists of one thousand acres in Groton and Hebron – and is touted for its “incredible views and numerous opportunities for observing wildlife year-round.”  But if you look to northern ridgelines, those “incredible views” are obscured by 24 whooshing windmills.  As for viewing wildlife, you might see some falcons, bats, and songbirds, both alive and dead.  Wind farms are notorious for killing birds and bats.

To summarize, the Cockermouth Forest abuts Groton Wind.  The Forest Society had been working for years to put Groton Wind’s land under a “no development” conservation easement.  Groton Wind then leased the land from Green Acres Woodlands and made a sizable contribution to an easement stewardship fund.  The Forest Society accepted valuable in-kind work and environmental information from Groton Wind developers and took no position on the project.  Development is prohibited on some 6,500 acres, but yet, somehow the towers are already built on mountaintops that are apparently not covered by the conservation agreement, although their roads to service the wind turbines cut through the conserved land.

The Forest Society’s latest money raising campaign is called, “Trees Not Towers,” yet it clearly doesn’t apply to 400 foot wind towers.  It is a stunning display of dishonesty and hypocrisy. 

- Fran Wendelboe, New Hampton, NH

Amid climate crisis, we cannot dismiss Northern Pass

 

Editorial: Amid climate crisis, we cannot dismiss Northern Pass

 

(Entire article posted below via Concord Monitor)

In May, the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere hit 400 parts per million, the highest level in more than 3 million years. If nothing is done to reduce carbon emissions from the burning of fossil fuels, the globe’s average temperature increase could top 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit). That’s the level beyond which many scientists believe glaciers will melt even more rapidly and global crop failures could be widespread. At current emission levels, according to the International Energy Agency, the world is poised to see an average temperature increase of 3.6 to 5.3 degrees Celsius by the end of the century.

During last week’s heat wave, New England’s power plants, including the ancient coal plant in Bow, had to be run full-blast to keep the region’s air conditioners working. The plants, most of them powered by natural gas, pumped carbon dioxide into the air, feeding global warming. This loop must be broken. That’s the backdrop behind the Monitor’s consideration of Public Service of New Hampshire’s controversial Northern Pass project to bring hydroelectric power south from Quebec.

Energy conservation and the increased use of power from the sun, wind and tides won’t, in the foreseeable future, come remotely close to meeting the energy needs of the region or world. Especially in the aftermath of the Fukushima Daiichi disaster in Japan, building more nuclear power plants, at least in New England, is politically and economically impossible. But something must be done or, if the worst predictions come true, Portsmouth will be under water.

Large-scale hydroelectric projects like those built by Quebec’s government are not environmentally benign, but on balance their power is cleaner than the electricity produced by burning fossil fuels.

The 1,200 megawatts of energy the Northern Pass line will carry will displace more expensive electricity generated at fossil fuel plants. Most of the fuel displaced will be natural gas, but importing Quebec power will mean that coal- and oil-fired plants like those owned by PSNH will operate even less often than they do now.

Opposition to the new 187-mile DC power line, chiefly by North Country residents and major environmental organizations, forced PSNH to improve its plan by, among other things, altering the route and lowering many towers. The average height, the utility says, will be 85 feet, about the height of a full-grown red oak and 30 or 40 feet shorter than a prime white pine. Some towers will top the trees and, depending on their proximity to the line, some properties will lose value. Within limits, their owners should be compensated. But the doomsday talk of a collapse of the tourist industry and real estate values is just that, doomsday talk. The impact, we believe, will be modest to minimal.

The utility now wants to bury 8 miles of line under roads in several North Country towns, a decision forced on it by successful efforts to block other routes with conservation easements. Burying the entire power line is not feasible economically nor wise environmentally, at least not along the utility’s existing 140-mile right-of-way, which passes through the White Mountains. But PSNH’s transmission corridor is probably its biggest asset, an asset whose value will increase drastically if Hyro Quebec builds the $1.2 billion line along it. The company may need to further monetize the line to survive economically. We recognize that.

Ideally, the state would have created a publicly-owned energy corridor along highways and railroad beds years ago to permit the easy burial of power lines. The impact on the landscape would be minimal; the revenue received would go to taxpayers, not corporate stockholders. The Legislature is exploring the possibility of doing so, and it should act with dispatch. Hydro Quebec appears destined to expand and the need to lower the region’s energy costs, reduce carbon emissions and guard against a spike in the natural gas that now powers the economy is real.

For now, however, the climate clock is ticking, no state energy corridor is in sight, and no one else has a project in the works that could lead to as big a reduction in carbon emissions.

The Northern Pass project could be further improved, perhaps by burying more of it in scenic areas, but should not be rejected out of hand.

ICYMI: Forest Society's Priorities Blowing in the Wind

 

(Entire article posted below courtesy of NHBR.com)

Forest Society’s priorities are blowin’ in the wind

The organization had numerous reasons to oppose Groton Wind, but never did

 

What has become of the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests’ mission and priorities? It appears that misguided fundraising has the organization lost in the woods.

The Forest Society has raised and spent millions buying land in hopes of killing the Northern Pass project, claiming transmission lines would damage New Hampshire’s landscape. Forest Society spokesman Will Abbott recently stated, “The economies of central and northern New Hampshire are heavily dependent on the landscape, and if you scar the landscape, you scar the economy.”

Naturally, one would think the Forest Society would be equally opposed to 400-foot-tall, night-lit wind turbines “scarring” the tops of well-known and scenic mountains that can be seen up to 40 miles away. Yet instead of opposing the massive 24-tower wind farm, the Forest Society played a strange and significant role in paving the way for that project to be built.

In 2009, Spanish-owned Iberdola Renewables came to New Hampshire wanting to build “Groton Wind,” needing to lease about 3,900 acres from Green Acres Woodlands, a private timberland owner. Groton Wind knew the Forest Society was trying to put the land under a conservation easement, and told the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services in October 2009, “Groton Wind is planning to assist the Forest Society to help make this happen.”

At a 2009 meeting with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Groton Wind said it was assisting the Forest Society in getting the easement, “by providing in-kind services and environmental information and potentially funding of the project.” It was suggested that its “proposed contribution to the [Forest Society] conservation easement over the leased lands could be considered as appropriate mitigation,” to get Groton Wind approved.

An April 2010 Forest Society letter to DES attempted to clarify the strange relationship between the threesome: landowner Green Acres Woodlands, the Spanish wind farm developer that needed the land, and the Forest Society, which supposedly wanted to protect the land from development.

In her letter, Forest Society President Jane Difley admitted that the society was being “compensated” by Green Acres Woodlands, which was now listed as a wind farm partner, and that the Forest Society would “not be offering an opinion on the wind project as part of the permitting process.”

It’s no wonder. In its permit application, Groton Wind states that as compensatory mitigation for its wetlands impacts, it will assist the Forest Society “in its efforts to protect up to 6,578 acres of land in Groton, Hebron, Rumney, Dorchester, and Plymouth in a conservation easement …”

The Forest Society was also happy to accept Groton Wind’s in-kind service for “survey and other data,” but this does not imply that they support the project. As Shakespeare writes in Hamlet, “The lady doth protest too much, methinks.”

The Forest Society had numerous reasons to oppose Groton Wind, including a multi-year effort to put the land under a conservation easement through the federally funded Forest Legacy Program.

In November 2007, the Forest Society declared the land “forms the core of one of the largest and most ecologically rich forests south of the White Mountains.”

Another reason is that the Forest Society’s Cockermouth Forest abuts Groton Wind. Cockermouth consists of 1,000 acres in Groton and Hebron and is touted for its “incredible views and numerous opportunities for observing wildlife year-round.”

But if you look to northern ridgelines, those “incredible views” are obscured by 24 whooshing windmills. As for viewing wildlife, you might see some falcons, bats, and songbirds, both alive and dead. Wind farms are notorious for killing birds and bats.

The Forest Society’s latest money-raising campaign is called “Trees Not Towers,” yet it clearly doesn’t apply to 400-foot wind towers. It is a stunning display of dishonesty and hypocrisy.

Fran Wendelboe of New Hampton is a former Republican state representative.

New England to Increase Hydropower

 
“People who are blindly opposed to hydropower are living in a 20th-century world where carbon emissions didn’t matter and there was less concern about the impact of the price of electricity on our economy and pocketbooks.”
- Daniel Etsy, CT Energy Commissioner

 

New England States Move to Increase Hydropower

By Erin Ailworth

(Key excerpts posted below.  Full article available at Boston Globe)

 

Hydropower could play a larger role in New England’s energy mix as five of the region’s states, including Massachusetts, move to import more of it — most likely from Canada — and at least one has passed a law that could allow electricity from large-scale hydrolectric dams to be classified as green as wind or solar energy.

Part of the goal, state leaders say, is to diversify an energy mix that in recent years has become increasingly dominated by natural gas, which now generates about 34 percent of the region’s electricity, and nearly half of Massachusetts’. On Monday, Massachusetts energy officials are expected to detail a plan under which the state will work with Connecticut, Maine, Rhode Island, and Vermont to bring more hydropower into the region.

Meanwhile, Connecticut earlier this month adopted a new law that allows utilities, in certain cases, to count electricity purchased from large-scale hydropower projects toward meeting the state’s aggressive clean energy goals...

 

While hydro has long been a part of the US energy mix, it has remained a small part of New England’s electricity supply... hydro generation accounts for nearly 8 percent of net electricity generation in New England...

Assistant Secretary for Energy Steven Clarke said officials here still think hydroelectricity could benefit the region.

“It emits fewer greenhouse gas emissions — far fewer than any fossil fuels,” Clarke said, and that will help the state meet its goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 80 percent below 1990 levels by 2050. “It can [also] help us diversify our fuel mix in New England.”

Clarke said the joint hydropower initiative between Massachusetts and its neighboring states will begin with analysis of the market and recommendations for developing projects “in the very near term.” Clarke said the group has already begun exploring several options, including Northeast Utilities’ much-debated Northern Pass project...

Northern Pass supporters remain committed to a project they say will benefit New England in the form of cheaper, cleaner power.

“We’re pretty confident that the Northern Pass project will provide just such an opportunity,” said Martin Murray, a spokesman for Northern Pass...

Connecticut Governor Dannel P. Malloy recently signed legislation extending his state’s classification of renewable energy resources to large-scale hydroelectric projects. Large hydro may qualify in certain cases where officials determine there is a shortfall in the availability of other types of clean energy...

Daniel Esty, commissioner of Connecticut’s Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, said the new law was not aimed at helping any particular project, but rather to help the state procure clean, cheap, and reliable power.

“We have just to our north a substantial resource that is very low emissions,” Esty said.

“People who are blindly opposed to hydropower are living in a 20th-century world where carbon emissions didn’t matter and there was less concern about the impact of the price of electricity on our economy and pocketbooks”...

 

Northern Pass to Bring Clean Energy

 

Northern Pass project to bring hydropower, add megawatts as clean energy source

(Excerpts below.  Full article at The New Hampshire)

...The Northern Pass project would add the 1,200 megawatts to the New England power grid.

Transmitted daily, 1,200 megawatts is roughly the same amount of power produced by the Seabrook power plant, said Mike Skelton, media relation’s spokesman for the Public Service of New Hampshire.

“That’s roughly enough power to power one million homes,” Skelton said...

The companies involved with the project are Hydro-Quebec and Northeast Utilities. PSNH is part of Northeast Utilities.

Together, the companies have been buying land across New Hampshire to begin the process. The two companies have been buying land across the state where they want to put power lines...

Data collected from the UNH Survey Center’s Granite State Poll indicates that only 14 percent of New Hampshire adults say they are very familiar with the Northern Pass...

“The benefits of the project are substantial because as a region, it provides us with low cost, clean, renewable power that will save us energy costs,” Skelton said. “It will replace existing sources of dirtier, costlier forms of fossil fuel that our region currently relies on”...

Skelton sees many economic benefits for New Hampshire.

“From a New Hampshire perspective, it will create many hundreds of jobs for New Hampshire and, also, millions of new tax revenue for many communities,” Skelton said.

Skelton looked at the states’s current power sources to explain what the Northern Pass Project could entail.

“...We have over 1,000 miles of transmission lines in New Hampshire already today. Northern pass is a 180-mile power line,” Skelton said.

“Of that 180 miles, 140 is going to be built on an existing right-of-way. That means there’s a right of way where another power line already exists today. So that means for about 80 percent of the project, Northern Pass will be built next to or within the vicinity of existing power lines”...

Though hydropower from Quebec may sound new to some, it already exists in New Hampshire, Vermont and Massachusetts. The line travels from Quebec past the Massachusetts border.

“That line is rated at 2,000 megawatts, but I don’t believe it transmits that much on a daily basis. But that line was built in the 1980s and essentially it’s the same concept as what we’re trying to do here,” Skelton said. “It’s built under a very different regulatory environment, different rules and the ownership is very different. But what it’s attempting to do is the same”...

..."If Northern Pass is added to the energy market—competing with fossil fuels—low-cost hydropower will displace the fossil fuels," Skelton said.

Because the hydropower will push out the more expensive energy, it will make the energy market cleaner. Skelton explains it’s all a function of the market...

..."By the year 2020, we’re going to need to build 6,000 megawatts of new generation sources to replace the 8,000 megawatts that is retiring between now and 2020,” Skelton said. “So there’s coal plants or oil plants that may be retiring and closing up, and we need to build new sources of generation just to replace those sources of generation”...

According to Skelton and the Northern Pass website, Hydro-Quebec and Northeast Utilities are using their own money to pay for it. Taxpayer money is out of the picture...

SPNHF Priorities Blowin' in the Wind

 

from the Coos County Democrat:

 

Forest Society's Priorities Are Blowin’ in the Wind

What has become of the Society for the Protection of NH Forests mission and priorities?  It appears that misguided fundraising has the organization lost in the woods.

The Forest Society has raised and spent millions buying land in hopes of killing the Northern Pass project, claiming transmission lines would damage New Hampshire’s landscape.  Forest Society spokesman Will Abbott recently stated, “The economies of central and northern NH are heavily dependent on the landscape, and if you scar the landscape, you scar the economy.”

Naturally, one would think the Forest Society would be equally opposed to 400-foot tall, night lit wind turbines “scarring” the tops of well-known and scenic mountains that can be seen up to 40 miles away.  Yet, instead of opposing the massive 24-tower wind farm, the Forest Society played a strange and significant role in paving the way for that project to be built.

In 2009, Spanish-owned Iberdola Renewables came to New Hampshire wanting to build “Groton Wind,” and needing to lease about 3,900 acres from Green Acres Woodlands, a private timberland owner.  Groton Wind knew the Forest Society was trying to put the land under a conservation easement, and told the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services in October 2009, “Groton Wind is planning to assist the Forest Society to help make this happen.”

At a 2009 meeting with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Groton Wind said it was assisting the Forest Society in getting the easement, “by providing in-kind services and environmental information and potentially funding of the project.”  It was suggested that its “proposed contribution to the [Forest Society] conservation easement over the leased lands could be considered as appropriate mitigation,” to get Groton Wind approved.

An April, 2010 Forest Society letter to DES attempted to clarify the strange relationship between the threesome: landowner Green Acres Woodlands, the Spanish wind farm developer that needed the land, and the Forest Society, which supposedly wanted to protect the land from development.  In her letter, Forest Society President Jane Difley admitted that the society was being “compensated” by Green Acres Woodlands, which was now listed as a wind farm partner, and that the Forest Society would “not be offering an opinion on the Wind Project as part of the permitting process.”  It’s no wonder.  In its permit application, Groton Wind states that as compensatory mitigation for its wetlands impacts, it will assist the Forest Society, “in its efforts to protect up to 6,578 acres of land in Groton, Hebron, Rumney, Dorchester, and Plymouth in a conservation easement...” 

The Forest Society was also happy to accept Groton Wind’s in-kind service for “survey and other data,” but this does not imply that they support the project.  As Shakespeare writes in Hamlet, “The lady doth protest too much, methinks.”

The Forest Society had numerous reasons to oppose Groton Wind, including a multi-year effort to put the land under a conservation easement through the federally funded Forest Legacy Program.  In November 2007, the Forest Society announced it was working on, “securing $3.6 million federal funding to buy a conservation easement on 6,578 acres of working forest in Groton, Hebron and Plymouth.  Owned by Green Acres Woodlands, a private timberland owner, the land forms the core of one of the largest and most ecologically rich forests south of the White Mountains…”

Another reason is that the Forest Society’s Cockermouth Forest abuts Groton Wind.  Cockermouth consists of one thousand acres in Groton and Hebron – and is touted for its “incredible views and numerous opportunities for observing wildlife year-round.”  But if you look to northern ridgelines, those “incredible views” are obscured by 24 whooshing windmills.  As for viewing wildlife, you might see some falcons, bats, and songbirds, both alive and dead.  Wind farms are notorious for killing birds and bats.

To summarize, the Cockermouth Forest abuts Groton Wind.  The Forest Society had been working for years to put Groton Wind’s land under a “no development” conservation easement.  Groton Wind then leased the land from Green Acres Woodlands and made a sizable contribution to an easement stewardship fund.  The Forest Society accepted valuable in-kind work and environmental information from Groton Wind developers and took no position on the project.  Development is prohibited on some 6,500 acres, but yet, somehow the towers are already built on mountaintops that are apparently not covered by the conservation agreement, although their roads to service the wind turbines cut through the conserved land.

The Forest Society’s latest money raising campaign is called, “Trees Not Towers,” yet it clearly doesn’t apply to 400 foot wind towers.  It is a stunning display of dishonesty and hypocrisy. 

- Fran Wendelboe, New Hampton, NH

 

 

ICYMI: Poll Shows Support for Northern Pass

 

A recent poll conducted by WMUR & UNH shows that support for the Northern Pass Transmission project is growing and currently outweighs opposition.  The most interesting part of the survey is that support is growing for the Northern Pass while public awareness is at an all-time high.  The more people learn, the more they like.

This is good news for proponents of clean energy and local jobs in NH.  It means that the corporate money and astroturfing campaign from big oil isn't working.  The choice between oil and hydro-electricity is clear, and Granite Staters know it. 

 

 

NPPoll resized 600

 

View the entire poll here.

Jobs Moratorium Fails (Again)

 

Another attempt to block green jobs and clean energy has failed.  

Following the NH Senate's highly-publicized rejection of an energy construction moratorium, opponents of clean energy tried to wiggle similar language into the state budget bill.

(Excerpts below from NHPR. Full article here)

..."Republicans meanwhile, tried to chip away at the budget, with 16 separate floor amendments: some aimed to limit the governor’s ability to scoop money from dedicated funds; others sought to secure more funding for charter schools...

...another [amendment] aimed to impose a moratorium on wind farms and to stall the Northern Pass Project. All failed"...

Chalk up another victory for green construction jobs and clean energy.  Our leaders are truly committed to bringing economic opportunity to the Granite State!  

 

New Study Verifies Transmission Benefits

 

A recent study by the Wyoming Infrastructure Authority (WIA) echoes many of the claims made by green energy proponents in New Hampshire. 

Through meticulous examination, the study states that the employment, economic development, and tax benefits associated with transmission line construction are undeniable. 

The project studied includes both generation and transmission, but the overall infrastructure investment is similar in size and scope to the Northern Pass Transmission project.

(Please view the full study here)

 

study1 resized 600

 

About the Wyoming Infrastructure Authority (WIA):

Wyoming Infrastructure Authority (WIA) is a quasi-governmental instrumentality of State of Wyoming. Created in 2004 by the State Legislature, the WIA’s mission is to diversify and expand the state’s economy through improvements in Wyoming’s electric transmission infrastructure to facilitate the consumption of Wyoming energy in the form of wind, natural gas, coal and nuclear, where applicable. The Authority can participate in planning, financing, constructing, developing, acquiring, maintaining and operating electric transmission facilities and their supporting infrastructure. Legislation provided the WIA with bonding authority of $1 Billion and other powers to promote transmission development in the State and throughout the region. It also provided the State Treasurer, with the approval of the State Loan and Investment Board, the authority to invest in WIA bonds.


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